El Paso – Managers and Professionals in Local Industry

Instructions

 

 

Jorge Villalobos talks about being first Mexican metallurgist in El Paso plant.

 

Jorge Villalobos asks about what’s going to happen when we shut down all risky industries in US; how these migrating elsewhere where they are less equipped to handle dangers.

 

Exchange between Jorge Villalobos and Joe Piñon over risks of technologies, pharmacy vs lead and other industrial risks; Pinon mentions Port Arthur denial of permit.

 

Jorge Villalobos on failures and resulting contamination from ASARCO plant in Chihuahua, early 70s.

 

Jorge Villalobos asked by Juan Garza about blending baghouse dust with other smelters’ materials, talks about shutdown of Tacoma smelter in which he was involved, arsenic; failure of transfer of safer technology to San Luis Potosi smelter.

 

Juan Garza asks Jorge Villalobos about who made decisions about what materials blended at Encycle; not necessarily at level of plant manager.

 

Charlie Rodriguez on what their research shows about which managers knew about the hazardous waste shipments.

 

Jorge Villalobos again on what he did and knew about over 1990’s, how didn’t know about the hazardous waste shipments.

 

Jorge Villalobos and others discuss lack of knowledge even among earlier managers.

 

Catherine Wilson-Shupe, Jorge Villalobos, Joe Piñon, Jose Manuel Escobedo, and Mario Navarez on company and others such as Landrigan who knew, came to know about lead’s dangers early on.

 

Frank Attaguillo and Jorge Villalobos on where the machinery of the El Paso Smelter went when it shut down.

 

Jorge Villalobos along with Charlie Rodriguez and Catherine Wilson-Shupe on different kinds of technologies in El Paso at different times, also comparisons with Chihuahua.

 

Jorge Villalobos with Chris Sellers, and Joe Piñon on implications of technological differences for pollution.

 

Jorge Villalobos with Juan Garza on electrostatic precipitators.

 

Charlie Rodriguez, Catherine Wilson-Shupe, and Jorge Villalobos on water pollution and use by smelters they know.